Uzbekistan: UNESCO World Heritage Sites

Uzbekistan is probably the easiest country to travel in central Asia, and has a concentrated corridor of some of the biggest relics from the Silk Road era. Travelling in this country is fun – lots of delicious foods, very friendly people, and comfortable options to get around. Below are some of my favourite pictures from Uzbekistan.

Uzbekistan Travel Photos – UNESCO World Heritage Sites

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Uzbekistan has a large number of historic sites and towns dating back to the Silk Route era. UNESCO has awarded four sites with a cultural world heritage status, these being: Historic Centre of Bukhara (1993), Historic Centre of Shakhrisyabz (2000), Khiva’s Itchan Kala (1990) and Samarkand – Crossroad of Cultures (2001). In addition, there is one natural world heritage site – the Western Tien-Shan (2016) mountains. Blurbs below are quoted from the UNESCO website.

Bukhara, which is situated on the Silk Route, is more than 2,000 years old. It is the most complete example of a medieval city in Central Asia, with an urban fabric that has remained largely intact. Monuments of particular interest include the famous tomb of Ismail Samani, a masterpiece of 10th-century Muslim architecture, and a large number of 17th-century madrasas.

The historic centre of Shakhrisyabz contains a collection of exceptional monuments and ancient quarters which bear witness to the city’s secular development, and particularly to the period of its apogee, under the rule of Amir Temur and the Temurids, in the 15th-16th century.

Itchan Kala is the inner town (protected by brick walls some 10 m high) of the old Khiva oasis, which was the last resting-place of caravans before crossing the desert to Iran. Although few very old monuments still remain, it is a coherent and well-preserved example of the Muslim architecture of Central Asia. There are several outstanding structures such as the Djuma Mosque, the mausoleums and the madrasas and the two magnificent palaces built at the beginning of the 19th century by Alla-Kulli-Khan.

The historic town of Samarkand is a crossroad and melting pot of the world’s cultures. Founded in the 7th century B.C. as ancient Afrasiab, Samarkand had its most significant development in the Timurid period from the 14th to the 15th centuries. The major monuments include the Registan Mosque and madrasas, Bibi-Khanum Mosque, the Shakhi-Zinda compound and the Gur-Emir ensemble, as well as Ulugh-Beg’s Observatory.

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Author: Priyank

Traveller, musician, blogger, bureaucrat. In that order. I'm very interested in trying new things and my interests are diverse. Food, people, places, technologies - I like them all. Whatever I do, I approach life with optimism and strive to make each day happy and fruitful.

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