Aurora

This post is part of my Russia travel series: Travel stories | Photo gallery

Cruiser and museum ship Aurora, docked at St. Petersburg, Russia

After the Peter and Paul fortress, I hopped on to the next island and walked along the eastern side until reaching Aurora (RU: Aврора / MR: अव् रोरा), a navy vessel that now functions as a museum.

Aurora

The ship was built for the Russo-Japanese war and was commissioned to protect the Baltic north. It traveled far and wide, including a brief stint in Manila, Philippines.

Communist Revolution

On the deck

When the ship was brought to St. Petersburg for repairs in 1916, the city was brimming with revolutionary fervour. Most of the crew joined the Bolsheviks, who were preparing for a Communist revolution. In October 1917, Aurora refused to carry an order, sparking the beginning of the October Revolution. A blank shot was fired from her gun, signaling the start of the assault on the Winter Palace, which was to be the last episode of the October Revolution.

Eat and rest

During the second world war, guns from the ship were removed and used to defend Leningrad. However, German bombs managed to sink the ship. It has since been restored and permanently docked on the banks of Neva as a tribute to the Russian revolution.

Starboard side

This post is part of my Russia travel series: Travel stories | Photo gallery